Tag Archives: newborn

Bathtub

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Journal from January 2, 2013

We have been slowly improving in our ability to keep the yurt at a decent temperature. Even when it is quite cold outside we can keep it warm if it isn’t windy. The stove accumulates ashes fairly quickly, though, so we have to empty them often in order to keep the heat pumping. Since Christmas, the temperature has been between 15 and 21 degrees celsius, for the most part, even when it is -20 outside.

I gave Alma her first yurt bath today. I warmed up water on the stove and bathed her nearby so that she wouldn’t get chilled. I also hung her towel on the stove so that she’d feel cozy when she was done. It is surprisingly easy to bathe her in here. I usually bathe her in the big tub at my in-laws, but from now on I think I will bathe her in her little tub in the yurt.

First bath in the yurt.

First bath in the yurt.

We haven’t hooked our tub up to any plumbing, so I have yet to bathe in the yurt. I am really looking forward to being able to have a bath/shower in here. For the past 6 months I have been showering in a myriad of places: outside (Mike set up an outdoor shower for the summer), at the gym, at friends’ places, and at my in-laws.

I am excited for when I won’t have to rely on other people for my own cleanliness.

All in good time.

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Not the End of the World

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Journal from December 21st, 2012

Apparently today is the end of the world. According to the Mayan calendar, the proverbial shit is going to hit the fan today.

I think Alma was woken up by a dripping roof this morning. I don’t remember her crying, but she must have been fussing because after I moved her I noticed that there was a drip. The roof was leaking from the dome, we think, and then running down the seam of the felt (so I’m thinking there is probably more than one leak).

This afternoon Mike was working on the ropes to tie the yurt down for the winter. As he was working on them, the wind picked up and the roof started to billow. It didn’t take long for the wind to lift the roof, causing roof poles to fall, the chimney to shift and nearly fall off the stove, and furniture to tip over. There was a big gap between the wall and the roof, so I was able to see outside. It was scary, mostly because of the not-quite-one-month-old in my arms.

Thankfully, Alma was asleep and didn’t notice me hunched over her for hours. She nursed for a little while, and then fell back asleep. I kept her under me and surrounded by blankets so she was quite peaceful throughout the whole ordeal. I think I feel like a real mom now.

not bothered

Not bothered.

The inside of the yurt looked like the “after” pictures one sees on the news after a hurricane. Thankfully the poles that fell from above didn’t touch us because of the shape of the roof and the position of our bed.

after the winds calmed down a bit

The yurt after the storm passed.

Mike tried, in vain, to keep the roof from blowing off further. Kris came and held down the canvas while Mike hung from the tono in order to keep the roof from lifting. We prayed.

After a few hours, the winds calmed enough for Mike and Kris to get some ropes tied down.

We are continuing to pray. The yurt is in a bit of disarray and is much colder now, unfortunately, because it shifted so much. Mike got the chimney back on and is now curled up on the floor in exhaustion.

We have a lot of work ahead of us.

A Visit from the Midwife

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Journal from December 19th, 2012

They say that you forget about your own general cleanliness after you have a baby, and I am no exception. Alma smelled of milk and I looked like filth, so when the midwife called to say she could visit us tonight, I felt that bathing was necessary. We packed our bath things and went to visit the grandparents and use their tub. It will be an exciting day when I can take a bath in the yurt.

When we got back, we had about an hour before the midwife arrived so I cleaned the yurt while feeding the wee one. Itwas a bit of a challenge, but not too bad. I have to say, nothing motivates me to clean more than the threat of company.

When she arrived, the midwife weighed the baby, checked her heart, and measured her head. She said that everything looked great and wished us a merry Christmas. I’m so glad that Alma is healthy and doing well. I also love hearing confirmation from medical professionals that she is healthy and doing well. I swore I wouldn’t worry about my kids the way my Mom worried (worries – present tense) about me, but I can already see that I am just like her. From what I hear, lots of mothers feel this way, so I am in good company.

Warm Bed

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Now that it is summer and the yurt is warm, I feel like I should post some journal entries from the winter. Here we go:

December 15th, 2012

We went to a rednecked themed Christmas party with Alma yesterday. She is three weeks old today and I can already tell that she likes to party.

I thought Mike was hanging out with the guys in the kitchen, so I was happily hanging out with people in the living room when someone told me that Mike was actually asleep on the couch. He was completely passed out, and so was Alma, so we went home early.

We had been gone for about six hours and incidentally in that time the temperature dropped, the fire died, and the yurt became a chilly 6 degrees celsius. I bundled Alma like crazy and nursed her until she fell asleep, blissfully unaware of how cold it was outside her cocoon.

Mike sat up by the fire, stoking it relentlessly, while Alma and I went to bed. Being endlessly thoughtful, Mike had put ceramic tiles from the stove in our bed to warm it up before we got in it. Nothing is better than getting into a warm bed in a cold room. I fed Alma under the covers when she woke up to eat throughout the night.

In the morning, the yurt was about 8 degrees so we stayed in bed longer than usual. Cat and Rob came over for breakfast, so we were distracted while the yurt finally got up to a comfortable temperature. Cat, Alma, and I snuggled in our bed under sweaters and blankets while the boys warmed their feet by the stove. I used to think that fifteen degrees was cold, however right now it feels quite nice.

The girls staying warm.

The girls, cozy and warm.

What I learned in the past 24 hours:

1) we can’t leave the yurt for more than a few hours at a time

2) life was wondrously easy when all I had to do was turn the dial on the thermostat

3) I am married to a very kind, self-sacrificing man (I knew that already, but it was reinforced)